Talk isn’t cheap: Engaging corporates on ESG issues (Part 2)

ShareAction In Part 1 of this blog post, the focus was on the use of dialogue between investors and corporates to engage on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues. A framework for this engagement proposed by Fabrizio Ferraro (IESE) and Daniel Beunza (LSE) was discussed, in addition to the way in which it might possibly be extended to other actors in the investment community, including fund managers.

How can this framework be harnessed and utilised by non-investors? Part 2 of this blog post takes a closer look at aligning the actions of investors and non-investor activists in interacting with corporates. Further, the use of dialogue by groups such as ShareAction, Fairtrade and Oxfam as part of ESG engagement is analysed. Ultimately, further collaboration between end investors, fund managers, civil society organisations (CSOs) and individuals will enable greater awareness and integration of ESG considerations by investors and corporates.

Continue reading “Talk isn’t cheap: Engaging corporates on ESG issues (Part 2)”

Talk isn’t cheap: Engaging corporates on ESG issues (Part 2)

Poverty and inequality: Views from two Swiss investment banks

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Inequality was high on the agenda at the World Economic Forum at Davos last week. The world’s richest and most powerful are finally starting to pay more attention to the issue. In this post, I look at how two Swiss banks, UBS and Credit Suisse, have discussed poverty and inequality in their recent publications. It is commendable that both banks have felt compelled to educate their mainly rich customers on the latest ideas and research on such an important topic.

However, in the case of UBS, their report raises many additional questions about how the rich see and understand poverty, in addition to the role that they feel they can play in combating it. Most concerning are some of the “findings” and “recommendations” which are likely to reinforce the status quo…

Continue reading “Poverty and inequality: Views from two Swiss investment banks”

Poverty and inequality: Views from two Swiss investment banks